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Cell
This journal offers authors two options (open access or subscription) to publish research

Aug 18, 2022

Volume 185Issue 17p3059-3278
On the cover: Oakleaf butterflies in the genus Kallima are among the most well-known and striking examples of leaf-mimicking insects. In this issue, Wang et al. (3138) explore the genetic and species diversity of oakleaf butterflies, revealing that the eastern Himalayan diversity hotspot is a center of diversification in Kallima evolution and that a single gene, cortex, is involved in controlling wing polymorphism. The cover image shows two oakleaf butterflies mating with their wings folded back, looking like brown, dead leaves. This genus serves as a charismatic model for understanding the biogeography driving diversification and natural selection producing a complex, polymorphic adaptation. Image credit: Albert Lau....
On the cover: Oakleaf butterflies in the genus Kallima are among the most well-known and striking examples of leaf-mimicking insects. In this issue, Wang et al. (3138) explore the genetic and species diversity of oakleaf butterflies, revealing that the eastern Himalayan diversity hotspot is a center of diversification in Kallima evolution and that a single gene, cortex, is involved in controlling wing polymorphism. The cover image shows two oakleaf butterflies mating with their wings folded back, looking like brown, dead leaves. This genus serves as a charismatic model for understanding the biogeography driving diversification and natural selection producing a complex, polymorphic adaptation. Image credit: Albert Lau.

Leading Edge

Stories

  • Harnessing social media to challenge scientific misinformation

    • Ben Rein
    Benjamin Rein is a neuroscience postdoctor at Stanford University and also a scientific communicator on TikTok. He and his colleagues in social media wrote the open letter to Spotify to combat scientific misinformation. In this Stories, Benjamin Rein tells us his story, thoughts, and lessons learned from publishing the open letter.

Conversations

  • Scientific communication on TikTok

    Abbie Richards is an active scientific communicator on TikTok who posts videos to communicate climate science and to combat misinformation. Cell editor Jia Cheng chatted with Abbie Richards to get her viewpoint on scientific communication through social media. Annotated excerpts from this conversation are presented below, and the full conversation is available with the article online.

Voices

  • Pride in STEM worldwide

    • Juno Obedin-Maliver,
    • Erinma Ochu,
    • Franklin Zhong,
    • Aqsa Shaikh,
    • Jacob H. Hanna,
    • Edan Foley
    Cell asked LGBTQ+ scientists around the world about how their identity shapes their experiences in STEM. Here we share six unique perspectives of researchers highlighting how their area of expertise, research focus, institutions, and geographical location shape their experiences. We thank them for sharing their voices and continued efforts toward making science more inclusive.

Commentary

  • Organizations in science and medicine must hold each other accountable for discriminatory practices

    • Julie K. Silver,
    • Garrett S. Booth,
    • Archana Chatterjee,
    • Cindy A. Crusto,
    • Nuha El-Sayed,
    • Talya K. Fleming,
    • Nara Gavini,
    • Sherita Hill Golden,
    • Jeremy W. Jacobs,
    • Reshma Jagsi,
    • Allison R. Larson,
    • Howard Y. Liu,
    • Gianni R. Lorello,
    • Roshell Muir,
    • Ruth S. Shim,
    • Nancy D. Spector,
    • Fatima Cody Stanford,
    • Monica Verduzco-Gutierrez,
    • Ross D. Zafonte
    Many organizations persist in working with others that engage in known, remediable structural discrimination. We name this practice interorganizational structural discrimination (ISD) and argue it is a pivotal contributor to inequities in science and medicine. We urge organizations to leverage their relationships and demand progress from collaborators.

Previews

Perspective

Articles

  • Non-canonical odor coding in the mosquito

    • Margaret Herre,
    • Olivia V. Goldman,
    • Tzu-Chiao Lu,
    • Gabriela Caballero-Vidal,
    • Yanyan Qi,
    • Zachary N. Gilbert,
    • Zhongyan Gong,
    • Takeshi Morita,
    • Saher Rahiel,
    • Majid Ghaninia,
    • Rickard Ignell,
    • Benjamin J. Matthews,
    • Hongjie Li,
    • Leslie B. Vosshall,
    • Meg A. Younger
    Open Access
    Humans produce a complex blend of odor cues that attract female mosquitoes, and these cues are typically detected by olfactory neurons expressing a single receptor. In female Aedes aegypti mosquitos, however, many of these neurons co-express multiple chemosensory receptors directly affecting mosquito behavior and challenging the canonical one-receptor-to-one-neuron organization.
  • Featured Article
  • Melanopsin retinal ganglion cells mediate light-promoted brain development

    • Jiaxi Hu,
    • Yiming Shi,
    • Jiaming Zhang,
    • Xinfeng Huang,
    • Qian Wang,
    • Hang Zhao,
    • Jiawei Shen,
    • Zhiping Chen,
    • Wei Song,
    • Ping Zheng,
    • Shulu Zhan,
    • Yanping Sun,
    • Pengfei Cai,
    • Kai An,
    • Changjie Ouyang,
    • Baizhen Zhao,
    • Qixin Zhou,
    • Lin Xu,
    • Wei Xiong,
    • Zhi Zhang,
    • Jianjun Meng,
    • Jutao Chen,
    • Yuqian Ma,
    • Huan Zhao,
    • Mei Zhang,
    • Kun Qu,
    • Ji Hu,
    • Minhua Luo,
    • Fuqiang Xu,
    • Xiaowei Chen,
    • Ying Xiong,
    • Jin Bao,
    • Tian Xue
    Light sensation by intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells early in life ensures proper learning ability in adult mice by activating oxytocin-releasing neurons, which in turn promotes cortical synaptogenesis.
  • The evolution and diversification of oakleaf butterflies

    • Shuting Wang,
    • Dequn Teng,
    • Xueyan Li,
    • Peiwen Yang,
    • Wa Da,
    • Yiming Zhang,
    • Yubo Zhang,
    • Guichun Liu,
    • Xinshuang Zhang,
    • Wenting Wan,
    • Zhiwei Dong,
    • Donghui Wang,
    • Shun Huang,
    • Zhisheng Jiang,
    • Qingyi Wang,
    • David J. Lohman,
    • Yongjie Wu,
    • Linlin Zhang,
    • Fenghai Jia,
    • Erica Westerman,
    • Li Zhang,
    • Wen Wang,
    • Wei Zhang
    Macro- and micro-evolutionary analyses reveal that biogeography drove the diversification of oakleaf butterflies within the Himalayan mountain ecosystem and natural selection produced complex, polymorphic adaptations.
  • Repeat-based holocentromeres influence genome architecture and karyotype evolution

    • Paulo G. Hofstatter,
    • Gokilavani Thangavel,
    • Thomas Lux,
    • Pavel Neumann,
    • Tihana Vondrak,
    • Petr Novak,
    • Meng Zhang,
    • Lucas Costa,
    • Marco Castellani,
    • Alison Scott,
    • Helena Toegelová,
    • Joerg Fuchs,
    • Yennifer Mata-Sucre,
    • Yhanndra Dias,
    • André L.L. Vanzela,
    • Bruno Huettel,
    • Cicero C.S. Almeida,
    • Hana Šimková,
    • Gustavo Souza,
    • Andrea Pedrosa-Harand,
    • Jiri Macas,
    • Klaus F.X. Mayer,
    • Andreas Houben,
    • André Marques
    Open Access
    While most eukaryotes contain single regional centromeres, several plant and animal lineages assemble holocentromeres along the entire chromosome length. The assembly of chromosome-scale holocentric genomes with repeat-based holocentromeres from beak-sedges and their closest monocentric relative sheds light on important aspects of genome architecture and evolution influenced by centromere organization.
  • The intrinsic and extrinsic effects of TET proteins during gastrulation

    • Saifeng Cheng,
    • Markus Mittnenzweig,
    • Yoav Mayshar,
    • Aviezer Lifshitz,
    • Marko Dunjić,
    • Yoach Rais,
    • Raz Ben-Yair,
    • Stephanie Gehrs,
    • Elad Chomsky,
    • Zohar Mukamel,
    • Hernan Rubinstein,
    • Katharina Schlereth,
    • Netta Reines,
    • Ayelet-Hashahar Orenbuch,
    • Amos Tanay,
    • Yonatan Stelzer
    Open Access
    Single-embryo, single-cell temporal models of embryos lacking Tet contribution, either partially or fully, clarify the cell-intrinsic effects of the TET machinery from its subsequent tissue-level ramifications. TET-mediated demethylation alters gene expression in a lineage- and time-specific fashion, but such alterations can be overcome in the presence of inter-cellular signals from neighboring cells.
  • PABP/purine-rich motif as an initiation module for cap-independent translation in pattern-triggered immunity

    • Jinlong Wang,
    • Xing Zhang,
    • George H. Greene,
    • Guoyong Xu,
    • Xinnian Dong
    Open Access
    Study of the pattern-triggered immunity (PTI) signaling pathway unveils a cap-independent translation mechanism for facilitating stress-induced translatome reprogramming.
  • Structure of a fully assembled tumor-specific T cell receptor ligated by pMHC

    • Lukas Sušac,
    • Mai T. Vuong,
    • Christoph Thomas,
    • Sören von Bülow,
    • Caitlin O’Brien-Ball,
    • Ana Mafalda Santos,
    • Ricardo A. Fernandes,
    • Gerhard Hummer,
    • Robert Tampé,
    • Simon J. Davis
    Open Access
    Cryo-EM structural analysis of a T cell receptor (TCR) complex bound to a tumor-specific human class I pMHC indicates the functional impact of connecting peptides and sterol lipid for complex assembly and suggests that TCR signaling may be triggered without spontaneous structural rearrangements.
  • Mitochondrial ROS promotes susceptibility to infection via gasdermin D-mediated necroptosis

    • Chi G. Weindel,
    • Eduardo L. Martinez,
    • Xiao Zhao,
    • Cory J. Mabry,
    • Samantha L. Bell,
    • Krystal J. Vail,
    • Aja K. Coleman,
    • Jordyn J. VanPortfliet,
    • Baoyu Zhao,
    • Allison R. Wagner,
    • Sikandar Azam,
    • Haley M. Scott,
    • Pingwei Li,
    • A. Phillip West,
    • Jason Karpac,
    • Kristin L. Patrick,
    • Robert O. Watson
    Disease-associated mutations in the kinase Lrrk2 promote association of gasdermin D with mitochondrial membranes, which induces release of reactive oxygen species, a switch toward necroptotic cell death, and hyperinflammatory pathology.
  • Epigenetic reader SP140 loss of function drives Crohn’s disease due to uncontrolled macrophage topoisomerases

    • Hajera Amatullah,
    • Isabella Fraschilla,
    • Sreehaas Digumarthi,
    • Julie Huang,
    • Fatemeh Adiliaghdam,
    • Gracia Bonilla,
    • Lai Ping Wong,
    • Marie-Eve Rivard,
    • Claudine Beauchamp,
    • Virginie Mercier,
    • Philippe Goyette,
    • Ruslan I. Sadreyev,
    • Robert M. Anthony,
    • John D. Rioux,
    • Kate L. Jeffrey
    SP140 acts as a repressor of topoisomerases and maintains macrophage cytokine and bacterial killing functions, preventing inflammatory conditions such as Crohn’s disease.
  • Bacteriophages benefit from mobilizing pathogenicity islands encoding immune systems against competitors

    • Alfred Fillol-Salom,
    • Jakob T. Rostøl,
    • Adaeze D. Ojiogu,
    • John Chen,
    • Gill Douce,
    • Suzanne Humphrey,
    • José R. Penadés
    Phage-inducible chromosomal islands (PICIs) are highly mobile genetic elements that not only provide a diversity of defense systems in gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, but can also be induced by a helper phage to protect that helper phage and the bacterial host from competing phages and other mobile genetic elements. This reveals a complex mutualistic relationship between bacteria, PICIs, and their helper phages that may broadly affect horizontal gene transfer.

Resource

  • Intestinal transgene delivery with native E. coli chassis allows persistent physiological changes

    • Baylee J. Russell,
    • Steven D. Brown,
    • Nicole Siguenza,
    • Irene Mai,
    • Anand R. Saran,
    • Amulya Lingaraju,
    • Erica S. Maissy,
    • Ana C. Dantas Machado,
    • Antonio F.M. Pinto,
    • Concepcion Sanchez,
    • Leigh-Ana Rossitto,
    • Yukiko Miyamoto,
    • R. Alexander Richter,
    • Samuel B. Ho,
    • Lars Eckmann,
    • Jeff Hasty,
    • David J. Gonzalez,
    • Alan Saghatelian,
    • Rob Knight,
    • Amir Zarrinpar
    Open Access
    Native E. coli strains isolated from mouse stool are genetically engineered for long-term engraftment in the conventional mouse gut and enable long-term systemic effects on the host, such as improvements in insulin sensitivity in mouse models of type 2 diabetes.
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